CPT

Calendar of Physics Talks Vienna

Scattering in Continuous-time Quantum Walks
Speaker:Daniel Nagaj (University of Vienna)
Abstract:The evolution of continuous-time quantum walks on graphs is surprisingly interesting. First, we can utilize it to answer questions about the underlying graph structure, with applications in games theory (Does the first player have a winning strategy?). Second, many-particle scattering is a universal algorithmic tool – as powerful as any quantum computer. Finally, as we are starting to understand the tools underlying these results, we discover control applications (where should a wavepacket go) as well as the ability to battle wavepacket dispersion.
Date: Mon, 18.03.2013
Time: 17:30
Duration: 60 min
Location:Hörsaal ATI, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien
Contact:Dr. Christiane Losert / Univ. of Vienna

Euklidische Pfadintegrale für den harmonischen und anharmonischen Oszillator
Speaker:Matthias Plaschke (Univ.Wien)
Abstract:im Rahmen des Seminars für Mathematische Physik
Date: Tue, 19.03.2013
Time: 14:15
Duration: 60 min
Location:Fakultät für Physik, Erwin Schrödinger-Hörsaal, Boltzmanngasse 5, 5. Stock
Contact:J. Yngvason

Zeitliche Entwicklung der Plasma-Rand-Elektronendichte während und nach dem L-H Übergang in ASDEX Upgrade
Speaker:Dipl.-Ing. Matthias Willensdorfer (Technische Universität Wien, Institut für Angewandte Physik)
Abstract:Als wichtige Methode zur Untersuchung des Teilchentransportes in Fusionsplasmen wird seit einigen Jahren besonders erfolgreich die Lithiumstrahl-Plasmadiagnostik eingesetzt. Eine signifikante Verbesserung der Genauigkeit und Auflösung dieser Diagnostik erlaubt nun genaue Studien des Teilchentransportes und der zugehörigen Elektronendichte am Plasmarand während des Überganges von L-Mode (niedriger Energie- und Teilcheneinschluss) zu H-mode (hoher Einschluss).
Date: Tue, 19.03.2013
Time: 16:00
Duration: 20 min
Location:Technische Universität Wien, Institut für Angewandte Physik, Seminarraum 134A, Turm B (gelbe Leitfarbe), 5. OG, 1040 Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10
Contact:Univ.Prof. Dr. Friedrich Aumayr

Nanostructures formed on surfaces due to the impact of slow highly charged ions
Speaker:Dipl.-Ing. Robert Ritter (Technische Universität Wien, Institut für Angewandte Physik)
Abstract:In recent years it has been shown that the impact of slow (keV) individual highly charged ions can induce nanosized surface modifications in a large variety of materials. In this talk, I will focus on recent results on the formation of pits in thin polymeric films and nanopores in freestanding, 1 nm thick carbon nanomembranes.
Date: Tue, 19.03.2013
Time: 16:00
Duration: 20 min
Location:Technische Universität Wien, Institut für Angewandte Physik, Seminarraum 134A, Turm B (gelbe Leitfarbe), 5. OG, 1040 Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10
Contact:Univ.Prof. Dr. Friedrich Aumayr

Quantum Optomechanics: a route for table-top experiments at the interface between quantum physics and gravity?
Speaker:Markus Aspelmeyer (Univ.Wien)
Abstract:im Rahmen des Literaturseminars
Date: Wed, 20.03.2013
Time: 15:00
Duration: 60 min
Location:Arbeitsgruppe: Gravitation, Währinger Strasse 17, Seminarraum A, 2. Stock
Contact:P. Chrusciel

Mass modes and secondary massive quark radiation
Speaker:Ilaria Jemos (Univ.Wien)
Abstract:im Rahmen des Teilchenphysikseminars
Date: Thu, 21.03.2013
Time: 14:15
Duration: 60 min
Location:Fakultät für Physik, Erwin Schrödinger-Hörsaal, Boltzmanngasse 5, 5. Stock
Contact:A. Hoang, H. Neufeld

Fundamental constants, gravity and cosmology
Speaker:Jean-Philippe UZAN (CNRS, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)
Abstract:Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect a violation of the equivalence principle. Thus, it is of importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. I will first recall the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. I will then sketch the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying. Many experimental and observational constraints have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. I will provide a summary of these observations. To finish, cosmology, and in particular the models of the early universe, allows to address the question of understanding their numerical values. While very speculative, and probably out of reach of any experimental or observational check, this may be the only insight to understand the apparent fine-tuning that the constants seem to confront us with.
Date: Fri, 22.03.2013
Time: 15:30
Location:Atominstitut, Hörsaal, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien
Contact:T. Schumm